Keepin clothes on

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Someone asked me, “How did you get the boys to wear some clothes indoors?”

Okay…. so clothes aren’t HUGE at our house… I try to make sure they’re dressed when people come over, or if I plan to take pictures/videos for our page…

But here are a couple ways I’ve gotten my kids to wear clothes…

So I don’t know if you’ve ever spent a summer (or whatever) where you weren’t really wearing a lot of clothes… then when you put more clothes on because you had to go back to school/work/etc… it feels weird… Like when I went from wearing tank tops all day every day while I was pregnant… if I had to put an actual Tshirt on to leave the house, it felt suffocating…

So when our kids go from being half naked all the time to being made to wear clothes – it’s horrible… especially when they don’t understand why they’re feeling like that. First instinct is to rip them back off.

So one of the ways, I helped teach the kids (and kind of in that process with Jax) is by making him wear PJ’s (the full suit ones) all day every day… because eventually his body will adjust and he’ll be able to tolerate wearing clothes like shorts and a shirt, because his body has adjusted.

Which, because it’s been hot, and I haven’t been making him wear his pjs, his body has readjusted and now he wants to be naked constantly. lol

The other way I get my kids to do things, not even always with clothes, but with everything… is I take the one thing they can’t live without and I don’t allow them to have it until they do what I want.

Right now, it’s Tyler’s glasses and playing on my computer… Justin has to eat a banana before getting skittles, and Jax, he has to tell me he wants to take a bath on his AAC before he’s allowed to take one.

There’s crying at first, because there’s confusion and that’s not how it was done just yesterday…. but eventually it’ll click…

The one that’s most similar with your situation is Tyler… so if he takes off his glasses, I take the computer. Which at first resulted in meltdowns.
But I didn’t give in… if he went reaching for the computer, I held out his glasses. Once he put them back on, he got the computer.

So for her, you could give her her favorite thing in the whole world when she’s wearing clothes…. if she strips, take it away… help her put her clothes back on, and then give it back…. at first it’ll be really hard… but if she loves the object enough, she’ll figure it out REALLY quick. 🙂

Even Jax (at 2.5) has figured out he has to ask for things in order to get it…. he still has little tantrums every once and a while… and that’s okay, because it’s age appropriate, and they’re allowed to have their feelings, but they still need to do what you ask.

Holiday Shopping List 2016

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It can be really hard to know what to get someone.
Let alone a child/teen/adult on the Autism spectrum, Sensory Processing Disorder, ADHD or with Special Needs.

Use this list to find something perfect for your family member, friend or even yourself… and if you don’t find anything, maybe it’ll give you an idea.
Feel free to comment with your own awesome finds below, you might help someone else out! (Add links if you can! 😀 )

1: Weighted Blankets by Maddy’s Closet
She has more than just blankets… like vests, belts, stuffed animals and lap pads!
Her work is very neat and clean.
She’s an incredibly sweet woman with a very sweet little girl on the spectrum.
Check out her website:
http://www.memecloset.bigcartel.com/
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2: Therapy Swings by InYard.
They’ve got more than just Therapy Swings too now!
They have “snuggle huggles”, weighted blankets and chewie jewelry!
All three of my boys love our therapy swing. It helps with vestibular senses and helps calm their bodies providing a little hug around them.
Check out their website:
https://inyardproducts.com/
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3:  Personalized products Vinyl Expressions.
T-shirts, plates, ornaments, bows, wine glasses > for any holiday… and this is just the beginning!
Just ask and they’ll probably be able to customize.
Check out their website:
https://vinylexpressions.squarespace.com/
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4: Children’s Wallet Cards.
Educational, non-toxic and extremely durable plastic card sets for kids.
Numbers, letters, colors, facial expressions, transit and fake money.
I can attest to the fact that theses are very sturdy little cards.
Jaxson is a chewer and LOVES mouthing them.
They’ve held up much longer than any other product similar to them.
They’re bright and vibrant.
They’re cheap considering!
Great for therapists too.
Check out their website:
http://www.youguysaresoawesome.com/#home
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5: Autism awareness products by Journey to Jacob’s Ladder.
A Mom created a business for her son Jacob, who has autism, that will provide him with purposeful employment after he ages out of the school system.
He learns how to help make, prepare, ship and keep track of the products.
You should see his smile on payday!
Check out their Etsy store:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/Journey2JacobsLadder?ref=hdr_shop_menu
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6: Web ID for those who may wander from If I Need Help.
They’re a non-profit organization that provides Web ID and information for people who may be disoriented or lost when they’re alone or away from their care providers.
They come in patches, shoe tags, ID cards, dog tags, pins, clips and more.
When you buy any of those, you get a free member web ID so that if your child/teen/adult gets lost, the person who finds them will be able to contact you.
Check out their website:
https://ifineedhelp.org/
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7: Chewies and teethers from Chewigem USA.
Safe, non-toxic chewable jewelry that is designed to discreetly hide a need to chew. Great for oral/sensory seekers who need that input… much better than pens, straws or other things that weren’t designed to be chewed.
They’ve got pendants, tubes, rings, tags, bangles, cups, pillows, shoe laces and more.
Check out their website:
https://www.chewigemusa.com/
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8: Therapy tools from ARK Therapeutic.
Along with chewies, ARK also makes a lot of tools for speech, feeding, sensory, fine motor, and more. I’ve got a list of things I want to get from them to help Tyler. Specifically their Z-Vibe! But they have spoons, straws, chewie jewelry, cups and more.
Check out their website:
http://www.arktherapeutic.com/
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9: Soft headphones from Cozyphones
Super comfy headband headphones for sleep, sports and fun. It’s also washable!! These are the only headphones that Justin will leave on. They have a few different styles, and the speakers on the inside of the headband can be adjusted. Plus the cord, short of getting a pair of scissors out, are virtually indestructible.
Check out their website:
https://www.cozyphones.com/
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10: Fidget toy by FidgetWorks.
Fidgets to help cope with ADHD, ADD, Anxiety, Autism, Stress and more.
Check out their website at:
https://fidgetworks.com/
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11: Spinners by Fidget This.
Custom fidget spinners.
Check out their Etsy store here:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/FidgetThis#items
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12: Fidgieblocs.
Handmade fidget and focus toys for kids and adults.
Check out their Etsy shop at:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/Fidgieblocs
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13: Fidget Cube.
High-quality desk toy designed to help you focus. Fidget at work, in class, and at home in style. Fidget Cube has six sides. Each side features something to fidget with: Click. Glide. Flip. Breathe. Roll. Spin.
Buy one here:
Fidget Cube
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14: Fiddle links. 
Developed by hand therapists. Interlocking, rotating links that are excellent for building fine finger dexterity and exercising finger joints. Calming fidget stress toy is especially nice for teens-adults.
Get them here:
https://www.therapyshoppe.com/category/P1008-fiddlelinks-fidgeter
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15: NeoBalls.
>Not for children< If they mouth or chew, definitely not for them. I’d say these are more for adults and teens. But I want them, pretty badly! lol
Snap, pull, mold, squeeze, and construct an endless variety of shapes.
Buy them here:
NeoBalls – Incredibly Addicting Super Magnets
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16: Haircuts with Calming Clipper.
Sometimes practical gifts are the best gifts.
Haircuts can be challenging for someone with sensory sensitivities. Vibration and sound from an electric clipper can be too much to handle. These are a quiet alternative to the electric clipper!
Find them here:
http://calmingclipper.com/
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17: Calming Clothing Company.
Snug fitting cotton garment supplies the child with the much-needed sensory feedback.  That reassurance and body awareness, in turn, creates a calming effect.
Check them out here:
http://www.calmingclothingcompany.com/
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18: Weighted compression vests by Fun and Function.
Comfy, easy to use and helps kids quickly calm and focus.
Find them here:
https://funandfunction.com/weighted-compression-vest.html
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19: Autism Awareness by Ausome Artists
Handmade art keychains, bracelets, and magnets made by two Autistic little boys, with help from their Mom.
Check out our page here:
Facebook.com/AusomeArtists 
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20: Growing Up Aspie – A Comic By Nathan McConnell
A comic about the struggles/benefits of growing up with Aspergers in a neurotypical world.
Buy a copy here:
http://www.indyplanet.us/product/143702/
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21: Fidget Tangle toys.
Find them on amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Set-Tangle-Jr-Original-Fidget/dp/B0034EKP8Q/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1481211529&sr=8-2&keywords=tangle+toy
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22: Yoga ball
Great for Physical and Occupational Therapy or just for fun.
Helps build muscle and strengthen for people who have low muscle tone or for those who have too much energy and need to bounce on something. 😉
Find it on amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Anti-Burst-Slip-Resistant-Yoga/dp/B01GTB4MZ2/ref=sr_1_3?s=exercise-and-fitness&ie=UTF8&qid=1481211552&sr=1-3-spons&keywords=yoga+ball&psc=1
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23: Stability Wobble Cushion.
Great for core strengthening. Also great for people to sit on while doing work… it helps keep their bodies calm while their minds are active.
Find it on amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Stability-Cushion-Diameter-Balance-Included/dp/B007LX6MPG/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1481211593&sr=1-3&keywords=balance+disc
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24: EZ-PZ placemats.
Silicone placemat + plate/bowls that suction to the surface! Anyone with kids could use one of these.
http://ezpzfun.com/
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25: Uplifting Autism book from Autistic Not Weird.
Chris asked 150 autistic children and teenagers from all over the world one question: “what do you love most about life?”

Their answers are insightful, uplifting, and a beautiful window into the minds of young people who think differently (as well as helping to fight negative autism stereotypes!). This book could be the perfect gift for anyone pessimistic about autism or struggling with a diagnosis, or for anyone who’s interested in knowing how awesome the world is from an autistic perspective.”
Message their page for your copy!
https://www.facebook.com/autisticnotweird/

26: Autism Awareness by Autism Awareness Shop.
100% of profits are used to “Put Autism to Work”, their focus is vocational training and gainful employment for those with autism. Find things like car stickers, clothing, pens, jewelry, accessories and more.
Check out their website:
https://autismawarenessshop.org/
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27: Children’s book by Little Monkey, Be You.
A heartwarming story about being yourself
and knowing you are loved unconditionally.
Check out their website:
http://www.beyoukidsbooks.com/
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Or maybe you’re a group of adults who would rather give to a good cause instead of exchanging gifts.

1: The Kreed Foundation.
After their son passed away, Erin started the non-profit foundation to provide children, teens, and adults education and technology to those who don’t have a voice and need one. They’re raising money to help supply families with an AAC device AND help the family, therapists, teachers, etc learn and understand how to use it.
Because of them, my son Justin finally has a voice and is learning how to use it.
Check out their website:
http://www.thekreedfoundation.org/
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2: Special Books by Special Kids.
He travels the world creating videos with neurodiverse humans in hopes of promoting inclusion and acceptance.
His videos are absolutely amazing. He’s helping people and showing us all that no matter what we look like, what our “diagnosis” is or how we’re portrayed to the rest of the world, we’re really not all that different.
Check out his website:
http://www.specialbooksbyspecialkids.org/
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Thank you for checking out our #Holiday shopping list!
What did I miss?
What would you add?
What do your or your child/teen have on your wish/want list that you didn’t see here?
Do you have a friend who makes something you think would be a great addition?
Add it in the comments!

I HATE that phrase…

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Can I just get all of the boys doctors all in one room and everyone can tell me how to raise and feed my kids all at one time?
Being told over and over and over from different people who don’t actually KNOW my kids is getting EXTREMELY overwhelming… and annoying.

*sigh*
So, I blew up on one of the doctors at the Pediatrician’s office we go to today. They have many Doctors/Nurse Practitioners there… and he wasn’t the one we normally see, but was the one whom they set us up with to do his Health and Physical to be cleared for his Sedation Hearing test in two days.

I didn’t mean to.
I didn’t want to.
I tried to hold it in as much as I possibly could… but as soon as he said that phrase… I just couldn’t hold it in any more.

So he walks in.
Says hi… starts typing.
“And what are we seeing you guys for today?”

I explained.
He finished typing, grabbed some gloves and walked over to Jax.
He starts listening to his chest and the first thing he says… before asking me questions about how he eats or how often… he asks if he has been tested for >>whatever<<… I said no, I don’t know what that is.

“It’s >blah blah blah< when they can’t stop eating. They just eat and eat and eat.”

I was like… seriously?!
“He doesn’t eat a lot… or every often”
“Huh”
*keeps examining*
He asks me very vague questions about his eating… I explain he really only snacks.. Mostly crunchy carbs… cereal and veggie straws.

And again… without asking me why… without asking me what I’ve tried… without asking me if he has any actual issues with anything… he starts telling me about this little girl…

Who was “quite big” and only two.
And I’m just staring at him… NOT smiling… because I was pissed.
This was NOT why I was here… and I JUST got to listen to all this crap two weeks ago at his Eval.

He’s going on and on about eating… and all I can think was, Jax has been barely holding it together by this point. He just wants to leave…
Then he started explaining how you start with meat, and once they eat that THEN they get fruit… then they get juice or a cereal…. And you do that all day… and that little girl didn’t eat the whole day… (In my head I’m telling myself… stay calm… stay calm…. Don’t freak out. You’re almost out of here… just keep nodding).

Then he smiled at me… like he was trying to reassure me… and said “They’ll eat when they’re hungry. Don’t worry. He won’t starve!”

That phrase… THAT FREAKING PHRASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Sure… some kids WILL eat if you hold out… they’ve been shown from an early age that they don’t “have” to eat what they don’t want to.

But for kids like mine… who will literally starve before eating something that they just can’t stand… it’s not going to happen. It doesn’t mean I don’t try and offer new foods… but forcing them… doing the whole “you’ll eat when you’re hungry” makes it worse… and makes them have an even worse attitude towards food. And it’s down right dangerous to offer that advice when you don’t know the kid. AT. FREAKING. ALL!!!

I couldn’t… I lasted as long as I could, and I blew up… I cried…

“I’ve tried that! I’ve got three Autistic kids with food aversions and sensory issues and I’ve tried that! It doesn’t work. What I’ve been doing has been working… when I tried that… it made it worse! I’m tired of getting crapped on about his weight every time I go to a doctor’s appointment!!”

Totally shocked… he back peddles “I’m not being harsh… I’m just trying to ask questions and find out… I don’t know anything about you guys… I’m just telling you what’s worked… trying to help.”

I wanted to yell: But you’re NOT asking… you’re TELLING!!!!

“I can’t feed him anything different until I know what’s wrong with him. He’s had issues since birth!! I’m trying my best!”

I explained more… Explained the tests we’ve done. Explained how I think he might have Celiac… that he gets severe diarrhea… that he screams when I give him different foods.

He stopped talking… finished the eval…
Jax and I both calmed down.

Then he starts telling me to not worry… that kids like this get better.
That kids on the spectrum just need positive parenting… and goes on about how to parent a child like him.

I internally rolled my eyes so hard.
FREAKING KIDDING ME!?!?! Is this the visit from hell????
NOW… NOW we’re not only telling me how to feed my child… you’re telling me how to raise him… without asking me how I do it…
UGHHHH

“I’ve got two other, older Autistic kids… I know what I’m doing.”
“You have two other Autistic kids? That’s uncommon.”

(soooooooooo you weren’t actually listening to me when I was upset… when I said I had three Autistic kids… do you think I was just kidding?!)

He finally left…
And I bawled my eyes out…
It’s been an hour and I’m still freaking crying over this crap.

I obsess…
I worry…
I stress…
I FREAK THE CRAP OUT about making sure I’m being the best possible parent for my kids… in all aspects. Teaching them, loving them, caring for them, disciplining them, feeding them, therapy, exercise….

And some guy… who hasn’t seen my son in 2 ½ years (he saw him at 2 weeks old), and for maybe 5 minutes, is giving me parenting advice.

I criticize myself enough on my own… I don’t need anyone else to do it for me.

Everyone is telling me what I need to do.
School tells me to work on this… therapists tell me to work on the areas they’re focused on… doctors tell me to focus on feeding and exercise…

What you all want me to do… and expect of me… is all “advice”…
I’m the parent!!!
I get to FREAKING choose for my children what is most important right now.
Plus…
I’ve got THREE Autistic kids who all have therapists and doctors telling me what they all need me to be focusing on…
There’s only one me… and I’m doing the best I can.

Especially considering I’ve got my own mental and physical health I’m trying to deal with.

*sigh*

I just needed to vent this out or I’d end up crying about it all day.
I planned on coming back to our page soon… but with all these doctors apts where I’m being beaten down… I don’t know when I’ll ever be mentally ready to come back… These migraines are killing me.

Anyway…  
I Love and appreciate you guys. ❤

“Sensory Sunburn”

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My good friend from Quirks and Chaos was asking me about pain and sensitivity when you have sensory issues.

(I love when people ask me questions because I think of things to say that I normally wouldn’t just come up with off the top of my head.) So props to her for helping me come up with this. Lol

I think the reason things can seem a lot more painful or even less painful to some people is what their skin (or whatever) is over or under sensitive to.

If the outer layer of our skin is super sensitive, we’re going to be able to feel things on it a lot more than other people would who don’t have over sensitive skin.

It goes back to being sensory seeking or sensory avoiding. If our skin is super sensitive or our nerves are over active then we’re not going to either want something touching us or we’re going to need something touching us (like weighted objects).

I think the best way to look at it is like you have sunburn. When your skin is really badly burned, you don’t want anything touching your skin. Everything that touches your skin, even the wind blowing, you can feel it on the surface of your skin. Your skin is over sensitive.

So when our children (or us as adults) freak out because the seams in their socks are obvious or the tag on the back of their shirt is bothering them, the best way to think of it is like they have a sunburn.

If they had a sunburn you would be more accepting and willing to forgive them for being over sensitive to the fact that those things are bothering them. Because it’s something you understand and can relate to. But just because you can’t see that metaphorical sunburn, doesn’t mean that it’s not there.

I think that goes towards pain in general.

Some pain I can deal with and some I can’t… Just like some noises I can and some I can’t.

Also, the anticipation of pain is worse for me at times than the actual pain. (Anxiety).

Sensory

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Sensory starts with the senses.
Hearing, Seeing, Touching, Tasting and Smelling.

For most people those traditional 5 senses help you in your everyday life and often go unnoticed.

(Most of us are familiar with the 5 senses, but we also have 2 other senses that are less well known: these are the sense of movement (vestibular sense) and the sense of body awareness (proprioception). I’ll have to write a separate post about those, or I’ll end up writing a book! But I encourage you to google and check them out if you’re unfamiliar!)

Some things you may not really notice are things like the fan in the corner of the room, the light above your head, the tag on the inside of your shirt, the gum your chewing or the candle your burning in the other room. You know they’re there… but they are JUST there. They don’t bother you or disrupt your daily life.

Then they can also be so much more than that.
A single smell can take you to a specific memory.
A single taste can make you reminiscent of old times.
A single song can send a tingle up your spine…
And a single picture can make your heart break or swell with love.

For people on the Autism Spectrum… those senses can be much, much more intense. Both in a good way and in a not so good way.

My three boys and I have sensory issues.
There are generally two types… Sensory Seekers and Sensory Avoiders.

People don’t have to be one or the other either, you can be both in different areas. Seeking smells but shying away from noises, etc.

I LOVE compressions… I actually like people laying on me. Weird, I know. I love the feeling of pressure on me. When I was a kid we had that game called “dog pile”. I loved that game. I loved the feeling of the all over pressure on my body (back then I didn’t know why… it wasn’t until this past year that I’ve realized I’m on the spectrum). My boys are the same way. They love tight bear hugs and weighted blankets. So that would be a “Sensory Seeking” behavior.

I HATE certain fruits and vegetables. My boys are the same way. We tend to love crunch carbs (all three of us). So, the crunchy aspect would be a Sensory Seeking Behavior and then not liking the fruits and veggies would be a Sensory Avoiding behavior. I don’t like the insides of pickles or cucumbers. I don’t like tomatoes… I can’t stand the consistency of them. It literally makes my skin crawl! Jaxson and Tyler seem to be the same way, where Justin is a little more accepting of different textures as far as food goes. Clothes- Tyler and I HATE the feeling of wearing clothes when we’re hot and sweaty. It doesn’t bother Justin at all. I cannot STAND the feeling of saltwater on my body… I feel sticky and gross, but it doesn’t seem to bother the kids.

So just because someone has an issue with one texture, doesn’t mean it’s all textures or all people on the spectrum.

Sensory also can be a HUGE contributing factor in behaviors like meltdowns. The way I like to look at meltdowns are like building blocks… the higher the blocks go, the closer they are to falling over. So we start with one block – the lights above your head can seem much brighter to those on the spectrum and might make them squint or hurt their heads. Two blocks – the noise level around them can seem much louder, so they can’t concentrate or hear you over the noise. It also might hurt their head/ears. Three blocks – the perfume or cologne someone is wearing can seem way way too strong. I can’t even walk through the perfume area in a store, I have to walk around or hold my breath. It’s like I can smell ALL of them way too much and it’s overwhelming. Some people may even gag (like if you took a big ol’ whiff of your garbage). Four blocks – if the temperature is too hot or too cold… you might not need a jacket but to someone on the spectrum it feels like they’re freezing. Or you might only need to wear shorts to help with the slight rise in temperature where someone on the spectrum feels like it’s scorching. Five blocks – the tag on the inside of their shirt or the seem on the inside of their sock feels like its rubbing their skin raw. Six blocks – maybe their blood sugar is low because they didn’t eat breakfast… and now they feel like they’re going to pass out when you might just feel like you’re hungry. Seven blocks – maybe they’re nonverbal or “pre-verbal” but still can’t communicate their wants and needs… so the language barrier makes it hard to explain how they feel.

Depending on the severity of any of those (or other) sensory factors… or any frustrations that’s happening or has happened before hand, could make the tower topple.

Sometimes Sensory Seekers just enjoy certain things… One of my boys LOVES the feel of silk. So if I leave my bra out, I’ve caught him rubbing it on his cheek. Or his weighted blanket has a minky side… he’ll just run his hands up and down the blanket for half an hour. Tyler loves sand (the one who has the BIGGEST issues with food textures)… he will sit and play in sand for HOURS. Tyler also seeks noise… we went to an Autism Awareness event where they had those HUGE speakers, and he practically ran over and put his ear on it while it was playing music!

But sometimes Sensory Seekers brains or bodies tell them that they’re not getting enough of something, which makes them crave certain things or may end up in behaviors. There’s a common phrase passed around the Autism Community and it’s absolutely true. “Every behavior has a reason.” Some people have problems sitting still. I can sit through a whole movie that I’m really into with no problems at all… but then I went to a Wrightslaw Conference and after about 45 minutes I was jiggling my leg, flicking my hands, tapping my pencil… anything I could do to help my body calm down. As soon as I was able to stand up (we had a break), I bounced on my toes a bit, shook out my arms and I was totally fine again. I sat down feeling “normal”. But after another 45 minutes my skin began to crawl again. And it wasn’t like I wasn’t interested in what the speaker was saying! I LOVED it! I wanted to hear everything, which is why I didn’t just stand up and take a break. Not that I could completely concentrate while feeling like that anyway.

For some reason my body told me I needed to get up and move. I explain it like you have to pee. When you drink way too much… and really really REALLY need to go, that you’re dancing around, twisting your legs, NEEDING to go to the bathroom, but you have to wait… when you FINALLY get to go it’s one of those “ahhhhh” moments. Everything is okay again. That ahhhh moment for us is being able to get up and walk around again… to move. Make sense?

So when I see Tyler (and even Justin gets that way, though he’s not as “bad”), when he starts bouncing around like crazy or climbing or getting angry and upset, I try to find ways to help his body and his brain get back to “normal”. Each kid is different, and each technique won’t work on everyone. Some things I use with my kids are joint compressions, bear hugs (but some kids don’t like to be restrained so short hugs for a second or two over and over can be better than squeezing them for a longer period of time), brushing, weighted objects like blankets, toys, lap pads. Trampolines are AWESOME, we have a mini one that is kept in our living room. Therapy swings can help… tickle monster (until you think they might pee their pants!!). Swimming. Climbing… Depending on the circumstance and area you’re in some of these can be more discreet than others to help in classrooms.

There is just SO much of our lives that is affected by sensory, ESPECIALLY in the Autism Community, that I could go on and on and on. And believe me… I really could, I tend to be a bit wordy. But one of the main things you need to do is figure out where you or your kids or grandkids or students, are either sensory seeking or sensory avoiding and help them either avoid or get the input that they need in order to FEEL “normal”. So that they can do what they need to do. It’s not always easy, but once you figure it out, it can make things like: trips to the store easier. You’ll know – okay the lights are too bright – they can wear sunglasses. The people and noise are just way too much for them, we can buy noise cancelling headphones. They are CLIMBING the walls and won’t sit down to do this puzzle with me, let’s do 10 minutes on the trampoline first so that they’ll be able to focus. You can’t sit at your desk and do… whatever you do for longer than 45 minutes, let your boss know what’s going on… take a 3-5 minute break, go to the bathroom jump like crazy and then go sit back down.

“Knowledge is power.”